Arts and Culture News

News from the arts world.

Many plays have been called "kitchen sink" dramas because of their attempts at realism, but Oh My Sweet Land takes that to the extreme. It uses not just the sink but also the stove, the refrigerator, a chopping board and a very big knife — and it's being performed in kitchens across New York.

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra at the Municipal Auditorium in 1967,
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Records, Special Collection and Archives, Georgia State University Library

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra last month announced that it had transferred its archives to Georgia State University Library's Special Collection and Archives. The collection includes programs, newspaper clippings, photographs, business documents and a host of other memorabilia tracing the orchestra's 73-year history.

This week's In a Broadway Minute goes off-Broadway for a new production of Eugene Ionesco's Rhinoceros with a new twist -- it's in Yiddish. Theater critic Howard Shapiro reviews this production Friday at 8 am and Saturday at 10 am. 

We Shall Not Be Moved is a new opera that takes its name from both the old spiritual-turned-civil-rights anthem and the Philadelphia black liberation group, MOVE. That group might be best-remembered for a 1985 tragedy: A police helicopter bombed the MOVE house, and the resulting fire killed 11 people and destroyed 62 homes in the neighborhood.

The opera, presented by Opera Philadelphia with the Apollo Theater, had its world premiere Sept. 16. It revisits that house and its ghosts, while remaining centered on stories about young people in Philadelphia today.

Wandering around the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, composer David Hertzberg stares at the walls in wonder. He's been through the rooms many times, drinking in the works by Seurat, Modigliani, Renoir and other masters. It's not just paintings alone, or even the Asian and Egyptian sculptures and other artworks arranged around the rooms, or the doorhandles and other pieces of daily, everyday hardware that might have adorned a home a century ago. Rather, it's the way its all put together.

On fateful September 11, 2001, the little Canadian town of Gander, Newfoundland, was inundated with diverted airplanes carrying thousands of passengers from around the world. What happened that day is the subject of the Broadway Musical "Come from Away." Theater critic Howard Shapiro reviews the musical this week on In a Broadway Minute Friday at 8 am and Saturday at 10 am.

Legendary theater director Sir Peter Hall might have ended up the grand old man of British theater, but he came from modest beginnings — Hall was born in 1930 in Suffolk, England to a father who was a railway clerk, and his family lived in a house without electricity.

Hall went on to run two of the most important theater companies in England — the Royal Shakespeare Company and the National Theatre — and directed Waiting for Godot and Amadeus, among dozens of plays, old and new.

Opera Philadelphia's Inaugural O17 Festival opens this coming week, and in the first of  a two-part series, A Tempo (Saturday 9/9 at 7 pm) takes a look at some of the performances, including productions being held in city museums. Host Rachel Katz will interview Lembit Beecher, whose I Have No Stories To Tell You will be paired with Monteverdi's Il combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda in a performance at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Mexican-American country star Rick Trevino brings his Texas guitar and his take on this Latino moment in America.

Chazz Palminteri’s "A Bronx Tale" has become a beloved story over the years, and now it's a Broadway musical. Join theater critic Howard Shapiro this week, when he reviews the new musical version of "A Bronx Tale" on In a Broadway Minute Friday morning at 8 and Saturday morning at 10.

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