Arts and Culture News

News from the arts world.

When gunfire broke out at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., in February, teacher Melody Herzfeld rushed into action. As shooting went off, she closed the door to her drama classroom, shouted instructions to students on what to do and waited for the rampage to end.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:


Jessi Franko Designs LLC

In an effort to expand its reach to new, particularly younger audiences, The Princeton Festival has announced a new "Young Friends of the Princeton Festival" program. This week on A Tempo (6/9 at 7 pm), host Rachel Katz will speak with CJ Ru, the Princeton Festival's director of operations, about this program, which includes discounted tickets on select performances  of the Festival's opera production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly, and a drink at intermission to those between the ages of 21 and 40.

Lincoln Center is reviving "My Fair Lady" on a grand scale, and this week Theater Critic Howard Shapiro reviews the musical. Listen Friday (6/1) at 8 am and Saturday (6/2) at 10 am. 

McDowell Colony

Dan Moses Schreier has spent more than three decades crafting the soundscapes of plays and musicals, including the current revival of Eugene O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh," for which he received his fifth Tony Nomination.  This Saturday (6/2 at 7 pm) A Tempo host Rachel Katz interviews Schreier about how he goes about creating the aural atmosphere of a stage production and how advances in technology have created new challenges and opportunities over the years. 

 

No doubt, this was something famed illusionist David Copperfield hoped would just go away. However, unlike one of his magic acts, he couldn't just make it disappear with the wave of a hand.

On Tuesday, a jury in Las Vegas found Copperfield negligent but not financially responsible for an injury suffered by British tourist Gavin Cox, who says he slipped and fell while acting as a "volunteer from the audience" during an illusion in Las Vegas in 2013.

One of the oldest and most distinguished Spanish language theaters in the U.S. is housed in a converted Manhattan brownstone. "It started actually as a private house," explains Robert Federico, executive producer of Repertorio Español.

The space is tiny — rickety wooden stairs lead backstage and small props are stored in the hallway. The sets are designed to be stashed flush against walls behind black curtains.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

The #MeToo movement has been a cultural reckoning across industries, from Hollywood to restaurants — but one of the oldest that's been affected is classical music. In March, James Levine, a longtime conductor of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, was fired for allegations of sexual misconduct. And now, centuries-old works from Carmen to Don Giovanni are being challenged for misogynistic plots and themes.

Rosalie O’Connor

Discussions on how to break through the glass ceiling in the arts are growing, and this week on A Tempo (5/26 at 7 pm), host Rachel Katz explores a new initiative by American Ballet Theatre to support the work of female choreographers, called Women's Movement. Featured guests are ABT Artistic Director Kevin McKenzie and choreographer Jessica Lang, one of the choreographers whose work will be included in next year's season. 

Barbara Cook On Piano Jazz

May 25, 2018

This week's Piano Jazz remembers Barbara Cook (Oct. 25, 1927 – Aug. 8, 2017), the Tony and Grammy Award-winning lyric soprano who was a favorite of audiences around the world. She was a star on Broadway as an ingénue and became a staple of the New York cabaret scene in the later years of her prolific career.

Don't call Thea Musgrave a "woman composer."

"When I'm composing, I'm a human being," she insists. "It's not a question of sexuality."

Julieta Cervantes

  The Iceman Cometh, Eugene O’Neill’s play about the self-delusions of a group of men fueled by alcohol, is now in a Broadway revival starring Denzel Washington. Theater critic will review this production this week on In a Broadway Minute, Friday at 8 am and Saturday at 10 am.

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