Arts and Culture News

News from the arts world.

This week, now that more of you have had a chance to see it, we're finally getting around to talking about the critical and commercial success that is Wonder Woman. Petra Mayer of NPR Books joins us to talk about Diana, her island of fighters, her romance, the inevitable Great Big Ending, representation that does and doesn't exist in this movie, and more.

An unusual take on Shakespeare's JULIUS CAESAR is unfolding these nights in Central Park.  Join Howard Shapiro this week, when he reviews this Public Theater  version on In a Broadway Minute.

Nearly 2,000 years after he held sway over ancient Rome, a notorious emperor is again causing outrage. The reason: Italian authorities approved construction of a massive stage amid the ruins over the Roman Forum for a rock opera about Nero, who ruled from 54 to 68 A.D.

Archaeologists and art historians are up in arms, denouncing what they see as the commercialization of the country's heritage.

Since joining the Dallas Street Choir in April of 2016, Carmelo Cabrera has found a new source of hope as he struggles to navigate the challenges of being homeless.

"Singing - it allows me to say, hey, I really am somebody, and my voice does count, and I can be heard," said Cabrera, who along with other members of the choir made their Carnegie Hall debut this past Wednesday.

A Tempo this week begins an occasional series looking at some of the challenges facing emerging artists and as well as some of the resources available to help them launch their careers. This week, host Rachel Katz will speak with Ed Yim, president of the American Composers Orchestra, about its upcoming Career Development Workshop designed to provide young composers with some guidance on developing their career plans. Tune in Saturday at 7 pm.

Conservative critics are attacking a production of William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” that’s running in New York. The basics of the play are the same as they’ve been since 1599 — the title character is deemed “ambitious” and is murdered in the Roman Senate on the Ides of March. But that’s not what has drawn controversy to the latest production.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Two major corporate sponsors have pulled their support for a New York City production of Julius Caesar. At issue: The titular role has an unmistakably Trumpian air. And, um, spoiler alert: He gets assassinated.

On Sunday night the spotlight will be on Broadway stars at the 71st annual Tony Awards. The evening also includes honors for some people behind the scenes — writers, directors and designers, for example — but there are many more, working backstage, who aren't eligible for Broadway's highest honor.

If you peek into the wings at a Broadway show, you're likely to find a stage manager, sitting at a desk with video monitors and lots of buttons and switches. He or she will be wearing a headset — sometimes called "the God mic" — to communicate with the cast and crew.

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