Arts and Culture News

News from the arts world.

Anne Sears

As students at Westminster Choir College rehearse Julia Wolfe's Pulitzer Prize Winning oratorio Anthracite Fields, A Tempo recently looked at how the performance at the Roebling Wireworks brings together the work's exploration of life in Pennsylvania coal mining communities and the industrial history of cities like Trenton.

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Misty Copeland Choreographs Her Own Way

Apr 14, 2017

Prima ballerina Misty Copeland on challenging beauty norms and loving yourself as you are.

Four powerful actors -- Mark Ruffalo, Tony Shalhoub, Jessica Hecht and Danny DeVito -- compose the cast of the Broadway revival of Arthur Miller's The Price, and this weekend, theatre critic Howard Shapiro reviews this revival on "In a Broadway Minute." Tune in Friday 8 am and Saturday 10 am.

John Leguizamo isn't new to the screen or the stage. He's best known for his 30-plus-year movie career in which he played a range of roles, from the killer Benny Blanco in Carlito's Way to a sloth named Sid in the animated movie Ice Age. But theater is Leguizamo's first love (rivaled only by his children). Now, at 52, he's wrapping up his sixth one-man show, called Latin History for Morons.

Du Yun, a 39-year-old composer, musician and performance artist, today won the Pulitzer Prize for music for her opera Angel's Bone. The Pulitzer jury describes the piece as a bold work "that integrates vocal and instrumental elements and a wide range of styles into a harrowing allegory for human trafficking in the modern world." Angel's Bone, which has a libretto by the versatile Royce Vavrek (Missy Mazzoli's Breaking the Waves and David T.

It's a curious thing how ancient music can sometimes sound so contemporary. Listen to "Morgunstjarna," and it's as if three centuries' worth of music history evaporates. The anonymous song from 17th-century Iceland sports a catchy, bittersweet melody and rhythmic hook that pop outfits like Peter Bjorn and John might be happy to whistle.

When Prince first signed with Warner Bros. Records, he didn't want to be categorized as a black musician. This was the late 1970s, before music by black artists was widely marketed to multiracial audiences; before kids in every household in America were glued to their screens watching "Thriller" on MTV.

A Tempo (April 8) explores the creation of the American Repertory Ballet's Pride and Prejudice by Artistic Director Douglas Martin. The work will be performed later this month at McCarter Theatre, with the score performed by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra. Host Rachel Katz speaks with Martin about how he chose the music and approached the libretto and choreography to bring Jane Austen's story to the ballet stage.

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