Arts and Culture News

News from the arts world.

Creating a hit musical which appeals to family audiences is kind of Broadway's holy grail — think current long-running shows, like The Lion King and Wicked, which have run for decades, or earlier shows like Cats and Annie. Critics don't always give these shows good reviews, but that doesn't seem to matter much. Now, two new musicals are aiming to get the kid stamp of approval.

This week on A Tempo, host Rachel Katz interviews Theodore Ziolkowski, Princeton Professor Emeritus of German and Comparative Literature, about his new book, "Music into Fiction" (Boydell and Brewer). The book explores the relationship between the musical and literary arts as displayed by figures such as Robert Schumann, ETA Hoffman and Anthony Burgess, and also examines literary works whose structures were based on musical forms, or featured a musical work as its main theme.

Although more women have been winning Pulitzer Prizes for music lately, it's still next to impossible to hear works by female composers performed by America's symphony orchestras.

This year's Pulitzer winner, Du Yun, has a lot to say about the situation.

Conductor Gustavo Dudamel — one of the most famous Venezuelans in the world today and one of the world's most prominent classical musicians — issued an open letter today to the president and government in his native country.

Long reticent to address politics directly, he has published his comments in a letter titled "Levanto Mi Voz / I Raise My Voice," in both Spanish and English. (The full text is below, in both languages.)

Paula Vogel's new Broadway play "Indecent" is about another play, a Yiddish drama that depicted the first scene of lesbianism on stage. Howard Shapiro reviews "Indecent" this week on In a Broadway Minute Friday at 8 am and Saturday at 10 am.

Last year, the Tony Awards were swamped, particularly in the minds of many who only follow theater casually, by the phenomenon that was Hamilton. It got 16 nominations, it seemed like (and was) a lock to win many of them, and every other Tony story struggled to get a little bit of sunlight.

As a composer, I entered a profession in which I knew I could actively alter our fractious present using the incomparable tools of art. After all, the intellectually curious and essentially progressive landscapes of our concert halls and opera houses seem like the perfect arenas in which to harness momentum for change and, through the aspirational craft of music, feel the resurrection of hope in the midst of despair and apathy.

When audience members start taking their seats to see Broadway's Indecent, the actors are already sitting at the back of the stage. Eventually, the lights go down and the performers begin a ghostly dance to klezmer music as bits of ash fall out of their overcoats.

In 1966 Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane gave filmmaker Frederick Wiseman unprecedented access. Wiseman documented staff at the Massachusetts hospital herding patients, often heavily drugged and naked, through bare rooms and corridors.

The resulting documentary, Titicut Follies, shook up the medium and launched Wiseman's innovative, Oscar-winning career. A ballet adaptation of the film premieres in New York Friday night.

The new Broadway play "Oslo" chronicles the intrigue behind the secret meetings that led in 1993 to the first agreement between Palestinians and Israelis. Hear Theater critic Howard Shapiro's review of this play.

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