Arts and Culture News

News from the arts world.

As part of its Festival devoted to the cultural and social legacy of the 1960s, Carnegie Hall will celebrate the art of the protest song in an upcoming concert that will feature both protest songs of that era and contemporary songs that explore some of today's campaigns for social justice. 

Barbra Streisand talked about women in Hollywood and national politics in an interview this week for Variety. But the remark that seems to have drawn the most attention is the star's revelation that two of her dogs, Miss Violet and Miss Scarlett, have been cloned from her late dog, Samantha, a conspicuously adorable fluffy white 14-year-old dog who died last year.


In celebration of the centenary of Leonard Bernstein's birth, the Curtis Institute of Music, Opera Philadelphia and the National Museum of American Jewish History have teamed up to examine how Bernstein explored questions of identity through his late opera A Quiet Place.

A Beijing-based company that runs bi-lingual K-12 schools in China and has been expanding into sports and arts training is seeking to buy Westminster Choir College from Rider University for $40 million.

The announcement by Rider this week of the non-binding agreement with Beijing Kaiwen Education Technology Co. was the first time the university has revealed the name of the interested party or a price tag. No further time line was detailed, and additional details of the agreement were not made public.


Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

George Li is a young pianist on the rise. At age 10, he gave his first public concert and at 15, he won a silver medal at the revered Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow. Li recently released his debut album on a major label and has been fielding offers, performing with some of the world's great orchestras.

John Corigliano is one of America's most acclaimed composers. He's won a Pulitzer, an Oscar and five Grammys, and he's still hard at work, having turned 80 on Feb. 16.

As part of its commitment to supporting new American music, Opera Philadelphia next week will premiere Cycles of My Being, a song cycle that delves into the realities and facets of life as a black man in America. Composed by Tyshawn Sorey with lyrics by poet Terrance Hayes, the work will have its world premiere Feb. 20 in a performance by bel canto tenor Lawrence Brownlee, who has been tapped as an artistic advisor to Opera Philadelphia.

There's a big, glittering musical in a classic key on Broadway again, where the townspeople of Yonkers sing and dance, the New York Central train toots steam and the audience starts standing in ovation from the moment the big-name star takes the stage.

Pages