The Lost Chord with Ross Amico

Sundays at 10 pm

Enjoy unusual and rarely heard repertoire.

Ways to Connect

With the exception, perhaps, of his own transcriptions of the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, Leopold Stokowski recorded more Wagner with the Philadelphia Orchestra than any other single composer.   Revisit some of Stoky’s early recordings, originally issued on 78s, including the controversial “Liebesnacht,” the original version of his symphonic synthesis after “Tristan und Isolde,” and a superb recording of “Wotan’s Farewell and Magic Fire Music” from “Die Walküre.”  The magic begins Sunday at 10 pm. 

A performance of his Symphony No. 3 sold over a million copies, making it one of the best-selling classical records of all time.  Henryk Górecki’s Symphony No. 4, completed in short score 30 years later, was to be the composer’s last major work.  Subtitled “Tansman Episodes,” the piece was written in tribute to his compatriot, Alexandre Tansman.  Tansman’s “Partita for Cello and Piano,” dedicated to the famed Spanish cellist Gaspar Cassadó, will also be featured.  Górecki does not repeat, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

Sergei Bortkiewicz, born in Ukraine, lived through two world wars and the Russian Revolution, enduring both poverty and personal tragedy.  Through it all, he managed to create music of lasting beauty.  Learn more about his turbulent life and transporting music, including the Quatre morceaux, Op. 65, the Symphony No. 2 in E flat major, and the Elegie, Op. 46, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

The Lost Chord: April 29 - The Lost Sword

Apr 29, 2018

He is best remembered as the author of “The Three Musketeers” and “The Count of Monte Cristo.” However, Alexandre Dumas churned out prose on historical subjects of all kinds, and he did so by the yard.  Tune in for incidental music written for his play, “Caligula,” by Gabriel Fauré; ballet music from an opera, “Ascanio,” after a novel featuring Benvenuto Cellini, by Camille Saint-Saëns; a poetic monologue, “Joan of Arc at the Stake,” by Franz Liszt; and a suite for symphonic brass, “The Three Musketeers,” by George William Hespe.  It’s one for all, and all for one, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

On the eve of the surmised birthday of William Shakespeare (on April 23, 1564), enjoy highlights from the world premiere recording of the complete incidental music for the 1920 Max Reinhardt production of “Much Ado About Nothing.”  The music is by Erich Wolfgang Korngold, one of Vienna’s most astounding prodigies, who went on to achieve international celebrity as a composer of film scores.  Korngold’s introduction to Hollywood was by way of Reinhardt’s 1935 film version of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”  Start counting out candles for the Bard, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

The Lost Chord: April 15 - April Foulds

Apr 15, 2018

Though steeped in the comparatively conservative milieu of the English musical renaissance at the turn of last century, John Foulds possessed a physical, intellectual, spiritual, and creative wanderlust.  So diverse were Foulds’ output and enthusiasms that it is difficult, if not impossible, to encapsulate the scope of his achievements within a single hour.  We’ll do our best, with his light concert overture “April – England,” “Three Mantras” from the abandoned Sanskrit opera, “Avatara,” and selections from “A World Requiem.”  It’s a Foulds paradise, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

The Lost Chord: April 8 - Roses of Persia

Apr 8, 2018

The mythical bird Seemorgh, from the Persian epic, the “Shanameh,” raises the abandoned newborn Zaal as her own. When Zaal goes out into the world, he is given one of her feathers, with which he is able to summon her in times of crisis.  Hear Behzad Ranjbaran’s symphonic poem, “Seemorgh,” from his “Persian Trilogy.”  Also featured will be Ranjbaran’s “Seven Passages” and Reza Vali’s “Folk Songs (Set No. 9).”  It’s a bouquet of Persian polyphonic music, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

For Easter Sunday, it’s an hour of music inspired or influenced by cathedrals, including Jennifer Higdon’s “blue cathedral,” Agustin Barrios’ “La Catedral,” Joby Talbot’s “León” from “Path of Miracles,” and Adolphus Hailstork’s “Sonata da Chiesa.”  Reach for the heavens with these architects of cathedrals in sound, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

In honor of Early Music Month, the focus will be on three works by 20th and 21st century composers who found inspiration in music of the Renaissance.  Join Ross Amico for William Kraft’s “Vintage Renaissance,” written for the Boston Pops, George Frederick McKay’s “Suite on Sixteenth Century Hymn Tunes,” after works of Louis Bourgeois, and Lukas Foss’ “Renaissance Concerto” for flute and orchestra.  American composers cast an affectionate look back, this Sunday at 10 pm.

For Women’s History Month, enjoy notable works by two extraordinary female composers, including a string quartet by the tragically short-lived Vitězslava Kápralová (pictured) and the “Serenade in D” – a symphony in all but name – by the indomitable Ethel Smyth.  Musical women make history, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

The Lost Chord: February 25 - Aural Borealis

Feb 25, 2018

Winters can tough in the north, but there is also much beauty to be found.  Tune in to hear “Northern Lights,” Finnish composer Uuno Klami’s musical response to atmospheric phenomena, and the Piano Concerto No. 4, subtitled “Aurora Borealis,” by Norwegian composer Geirr Tveitt.  Trip the light fantastic, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

The Lost Chord: February 18 - Taylor-Made

Feb 18, 2018

Afro-British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875-1912) achieved much in his comparatively short life, attracting the attention and advocacy of Sir Charles Villiers Stanford, Sir Edward Elgar, and Sir Malcolm Sargent.  His cantata “Hiawatha’s Wedding Feast” became a cultural phenomenon between the wars.  Unfortunately, the composer didn’t live to see it, and his widow saw none of the proceeds, since, always in need of cash, he had sold the rights to the music outright for 15 guineas.  We’ll hear it, among our featured works, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

The Lost Chord: February 11 - Denmarketing

Feb 11, 2018

Dacapo Records, the self-described “Danish National label,” was founded in 1989 to promote the classical music of Denmark.  Danish music composed over a period of a thousand years forms the core of the Dacapo discography.  I hope you’ll “Dane” to join me for Emil Reesen’s “Variations on a Theme by Franz Schubert” and one-time director of the Peabody Institute Asger Hamerik’s Symphony No. 7, the “Choral,” this Sunday at 10 pm. 

The Lost Chord: February 4 - Staying Power

Feb 4, 2018

Is it really “emigration” when you don’t go anywhere?  We’ll hear music by flagrantly anti-fascist composers who remained in Germany during the Nazi regime.  This type of opposition was described by Thomas Mann as “inner emigration.”  The composers in question did not join the Nazi Party.  On the contrary, they were condemned, their music labeled degenerate and banned from performance.  Tune in to learn more about Reinhard Schwarz-Schilling and Karl Amadeus Hartmann, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

The Lost Chord: January 28 - Wrestling Jacob

Jan 28, 2018

Gordon Jacob is perhaps best known these days as an orchestrator, but he was also a prolific composer.  In fact, when weighing the size of his output against his reputation, it’s tempting to underestimate – as the Angel did his Biblical namesake – Jacob’s tenacity.  Join me for Jacob’s “William Byrd Suite,” and then music of a more serious nature:  his Symphony No. 1, dedicated to the memory of his brother, who died on the Somme.  We grapple with the legacy of Jacob, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

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