opera

Maurizio Muraro stars in the title role of Gaetano Donizetti’s “Don Pasquale” from San Francisco on this week’s Sunday Opera (10/15   3:00 p.m.).  “Pasquale,” the 73rd of Donizetti’s 75 operas, deals with a foolish, old man who is tricked into allowing his nephew Ernesto to marry the girl he loves, Norina, with the help of the wily Dr. Malatesta.  Joining Muraro, in this September 2016 performnance , you’ll hear Heidi Stober as the spirited Norina, Lawrence Brownlee as the confused Ernesto, and Lucas Meachem as the happily scheming Dr.

The Lyric Stage: Oct. 15 - Arrigo Boito

Oct 12, 2017

Arrigo Boito is featured Sunday October 15 at 8:00 PM on The Lyric Stage. He was a librettist whose adaptation of Shakespeare for Verdi's Otello and Falstaff  ​help make them the composer's best operas. Verdi and Boito were the rare combination when the words were as good as the music, on a par with Da Ponte and Mozart, and Hoffmanstahl and Richard Strauss. Bryn Terfel and Sherril Milnes each sing an aria from those operas.

This week we have highlights from Vivaldi's Orlando Furioso, from a much praised recording featuring Veronica Cangemi and Jennifer Larmore, with Jean-Cristophe Spinosi conducting the chorus Les Elements and the Ensemble Matheus.

Baritone William Warfield (1920-2002) combined a wonderful voice and the gift of song with a great range of style. This week he sings a variety of songs and arias showing that range, including an aria from Handel's Messiah, songs by Robert Schumann,  Jerome Kern's Ol' Man River, and the complete set of Copland's Old American Songs.

Puccini’s “Madama Butterfly” with Lianna Haroutounian in the title role is this week’s Sunday Opera (9/24 3:00 p.m.) from the San Francisco Opera.  The libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa was based on a play by David Bilasco which in turn was based on a short story by John Luther Long.  That short story’s basis was in stories told to Long by his sister along with the French novel “Madame Chrysantheme” by Pierre Loti.  The two-act version that premiered at La Scala on February 17, 1904 was poorly received, but Puccini re-wrote it into a three-act opera and included the now-famous h

This week on the Lyric Stage (9/17) , excerpts from Luisa Miller, one of the last operas of Giuseppe Verdi's early period, a time of development that led to his breakthrough with the threesome of Rigoletto, Traviata and Trovatore shortly after the premiere of Luisa Miller.

Wandering around the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, composer David Hertzberg stares at the walls in wonder. He's been through the rooms many times, drinking in the works by Seurat, Modigliani, Renoir and other masters. It's not just paintings alone, or even the Asian and Egyptian sculptures and other artworks arranged around the rooms, or the doorhandles and other pieces of daily, everyday hardware that might have adorned a home a century ago. Rather, it's the way its all put together.

This week we have selections from Giordano's Madame Sans-Gens. In 1999, near the end of her active singing career, Mirella Freni recorded this live performance of  Giordano's version of Victorien Sardou's comedy drama. In 1792 the very lovable Caterina, Madame Sans-Gens - Madame Carefree - is a Parisian laundress  who is happy, carefree, engaged to be married, completely at ease.  One of her customers is a young officer named Napoleon Bonaparte.

Opera Philadelphia's Inaugural O17 Festival opens this coming week, and in the first of  a two-part series, A Tempo (Saturday 9/9 at 7 pm) takes a look at some of the performances, including productions being held in city museums. Host Rachel Katz will interview Lembit Beecher, whose I Have No Stories To Tell You will be paired with Monteverdi's Il combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda in a performance at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

This week on The Lyric Stage, selections from Ferdinando Paer's 1805 opera, Sofonisba, about an early third century Princess of Carthage trapped in a life or death situation between her country and the Roman empire. Jennifer Larmore heads the cast.

Paer was a noted composer in his day, and a special favorite of Napoleon. He composed in many genres, and his is works contain elements of both classical and romantic styles, making him a transitional figure in Opera's history.

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