Upcoming and Noteworthy

What's ahead on The Classical Network? Catch some of these great programs coming your way.

The works of Stephen Sondheim will be featured on this week’s Dress Circle (1/14 7:00 p.m.) but nothing from cast recordings.  Instead, we’ll be featuring a variety of ladies who have recorded Sondheim’s music over the years.  The list includes Judy Collins who has the honor of singing “Send in the Clowns,” the only Sondheim song that made it into the popular charts where it spent eight weeks and made it to number 6 in 1975.  

Thursday's Noon Concert: Melomanie

Jan 10, 2018

On Thurday's (1-11) Noontime Comcert we hear the ensemble Melomanie in music by Marin Marais, Shulamit Ran, Vittorio Rieti, Bonnie McAlvin, Nicolas Bacri & Sergio Roberto de Oliveira.  Melamonie plays both baroque and modern instruments.

On Monday (1-8) Bach @ One presents instrumental pieces by Dietrich Buxtehude, Johann Ludwig Krebs, J.S. Bach, J.C.F. Bach & Georg Philipp Telemann performed by the Philadelphia Bach Collegium from a September Bach at Seven concert of Choral Arts Philadelphia.

We’ll be traveling to Czechoslovakia for this week’s Sunday opera (1/7  3:00 p.m.) and two works by the Czech master, Leos Janacek.  The first is a story of misplaced love and devotion that results in murder entitled “Jenufa.”  The Jenufa in a recording from 1986 is the wonderful Elisabeth Soderstrom, Peter Dvorsky is Steva, the object of her misplaced love, and Wieslav Ochman is the misunderstood Laca.  The second opera also features Elisabeth Soderstrom in the lead, this time as Emilia Marty, the woman who has lived for over 300 years in “The Makropulos Case.”  

Welcome to January and a new year that’s hopefully happy and healthy for you and yours.  This week’s Dress Circle (1/7  7:00 p.m.) is staying with tradition as we’ll take a look at some of the shows that have opened on Broadway during the chill of January.  Those shows include “The Happy Time,” “Sweet Charity,” “Darling of the Day,” “Celebration,” “The Little Mermaid,” and “The Ziegfeld Follies of 1936” among others.  It’s a great mix of old and new, just like every New Year, and it’s here for you at The Classical Network.  Join us each week at 7:00 p.m.

Join us for Thursday's Noontime Concert featuring violinist Stephen Waarts & pianist Chelsea Wang with music by Schubert, Schumann, Ravel & Stravinsky.

A “complete failure” will air as this week’s Sunday Opera (12/31  3:00 p.m.) when Handel’s “Serse” (“Xerxes”) will be presented.  In 1738, this mix of high tragedy and low comedy went against the desires of audiences of the day, but it is this mix that has made it one of Handel’s most beloved and staged operas after, possibly, “Julius Caesar.”  Add to the tragi-comic mix that the king does not get what he wants, accepts it with humility, and lives to tell about it, well, it just made for a bad night of 18th century theatergoing.  Our cast from a 1998 recording includes Judith Malafronte as Xerxes, Jennifer Smith as Romilda, the object of his desire, Susan Bickley as Amastre, the princess to whom he’s been betrothed, and Brian Asawa as Xerxes’ brother Arsamene, the man who loves and is loved by Romilda.  

It seems that there are always suggestions for ways to approach the New Year, and on this week’s Dress Circle (12/31  7:00 p.m.), we thought we’d add a few more but from the musicals.  Some of those “words of wisdom” come from shows like “Do I Hear a Waltz?”, “Snoopy,” “The Tap Dance Kid,” “Mame,” “Mr.

Enjoy this Christmas Eve edition of Sounds Choral as Ryan James Brandau continues his exploration of the Christmas music of JS Bach this week on Sounds Choral, Sunday (12/24) at 2 pm.

Take a break from the festivities this week and spend an hour on Christmas Eve (7:00 p.m.) with The Dress Circle for some favorite holiday moments from the musicals such as “The Gift of the Magi” by Peter Ekstrom, “A Year with Frog and Toad” by the Reale brothers, and “Scrooge” by Leslie Bricusse, as well as a few film songs from “The Santa Clause,” “The Snowman,” and “The Muppet Christmas Carol” and some nostalgia with songs such as “Christmas in Killarney” sung by Bing Crosby and Kenny Gardner singing “The Merry Christmas Waltz.”   

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