Upcoming and Noteworthy

What's ahead on The Classical Network? Catch some of these great programs coming your way.

This Monday Celebrating Our Musical Future presents a performance by the West Chester University Wind Ensemble and also the West Chester University Concert Choir. Tune in at 8 pm.

Puccini’s “Madama Butterfly” with Lianna Haroutounian in the title role is this week’s Sunday Opera (9/24 3:00 p.m.) from the San Francisco Opera.  The libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa was based on a play by David Bilasco which in turn was based on a short story by John Luther Long.  That short story’s basis was in stories told to Long by his sister along with the French novel “Madame Chrysantheme” by Pierre Loti.  The two-act version that premiered at La Scala on February 17, 1904 was poorly received, but Puccini re-wrote it into a three-act opera and included the now-famous h

To many people, the name Johnny Burke is unknown, and we’ll be trying to remedy that on this week’s Dress Circle (9/24 7:00 p.m.) when we air a Johnny Burke Songbook.  We guarantee you’ll know many of the songs penned by this gifted lyricist who also wrote music when the occasion arose, and we’ll sample some of those songs from his Broadway musical “Donnybrook!” based on “The Quiet Man,” as well as some of his film work for the “Road” films of Hope and Crosby, “Rio,” “Morocco,” and “Utopia.”  Please join us every Sunday evening or as a webcast on The Classical Network’s website.  You can al

Shostakovich and Glazunov on "Music from Marlboro"

Sep 20, 2017

Selections will include Shostakovich’s “From Jewish Folk Poetry,” with soprano Benita Valente, mezzo-soprano Glenda Maurice, and tenor John Humphrey, with Luis Batlle at the keyboard, and Glazunov’s String Quintet in A major, with violinists Sylvie Gazeu and Ernestine Schor, violist Toby Hoffman, and once-and-future Guarneri Quartet cellists Peter Wiley and David Soyer.

This Thursday's (9-21) Noontime Concert from Manhattan Chamber Players features:

Brahms' Trio for Violin, Horn & Piano in E-flat, op. 40 &

Dvorak's Piano Trio in F minor, op. 65

On Friday's (9-22) noontime concert from the Downtown Concert Series we'll hear the Akropolis Reed Quintet (oboe, clarinet, saxophone, bassoon & bass clarinet) in music by Mark Mellits, Nico Muhly, Nikolai Kapustin, David Biedenbender & George Gershwin.

Today's Noontime Concert (9/19) is drawn from this summer’s Cape May Music Festival, featuring performances by the New York Chamber Ensemble. There will be selections from two programs. The first will include music by Philippe Hersant (“Héliades” for flute and strings), Johan Kvandal (from his Hardanger fiddle quintet) and Felix Mendelssohn (his String Quintet No. 2). Then saxophonist Eddie Barbash will join the group for riffs on a variety of old favorites by Cole Porter, Ruben Fuentes, Manuel Ponce, Vincenzo Bellini and Harry Warren.

Bach Cantatas 66 & 68 from Choral Arts Philadelphia

Sep 18, 2017

Join us Monday (9/18) on Bach at One for J.S. Bach's Cantata BWV 66, "Rejoice, your hearts" & Cantata BWV 68, "God has so loved the world." Matthew Glandorf directs Choral Arts Philadelphia. Monday afternoon at 1:00.

Celebrating Our Musical Future once again features offerings from the Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Oberlin, Ohio. This Monday at 8 pm we’ll hear choral ensembles from Oberlin perform music of Frenchman Jean Langlais and American Dominick Argento. Also on the broadcast solo performances by Oberlin students in music of again a French-American axis-  a work for solo cello by Henri Dutilleux and a set of African American Spirituals.

Performances from the San Francisco Opera continue on this weeks’ Sunday Opera (9/17 3 p.m.) with another tale of doomed love in Giuseppe Verdi’s “Aida.”   Leah Crocetto sings the title role, Brian Jagde is her Radames, and Ekaterina Semenchuk is the spurned Amneris.  They’re joined by George Gagnidze as Amonasro, Raymond Aceto as Ramfis, and Anthony Reed as the King of Egypt.  Nicola Luisotti conducts.  Stay tuned after the opera for some interesting Verdi including the sinfonia for “Aida” that was written, but never used, for the opera’s European premier in 1887 as well as another rarity,

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