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Cabinets of curiosities, also sometimes referred to as “wonder rooms,” were small collections of extraordinary objects, strange and often fanciful precursors of today’s museums, which attempted to categorize and explain oddities of the natural world.  We’ll hear three examples of musical equivalents: Dmitri Tymoczko's “Typecase Treasury,” Michael Colina’s Violin Concerto “Three Cabinets of Wonder,” and a selection from Robert Moran’s “Cabinet of Curiosities.”  Satisfy your curiosity, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

Elvida is one of Gaetano Donizetti's long neglected operas. (He  wrote seventy or so operas, and if some of them were not neglected, we would hear almost nothing but Donizetti's operas.) Some critics think that his early Elvida has earned its obscurity. According to one, for example, it's often light music does not match the dark plot of the heroine held hostage, thrown into a dungeon, and saved from being murdered at the last minute possible.

Host: Dr. Amanda Quist

It's the music of Guillaume Machaut on Friday's Distant Mirror with a selection of rondos, ballades and virelai  performed by Fortune's Wheel from their cd Pastourelle: The Art of Machaut and the Trouveres. Then Matthew Brook sings/recites  Machaut's "Le Layde bonne esperance" from Le Voir Dit.  Join Allan Kelly at 10 pm. 

Take flight with music from movies about airports and airplanes, including “The V.I.P.s” (Miklos Rozsa), “The Terminal” (John Williams), “Airport” (Alfred Newman), and “North by Northwest” (Bernard Herrmann).  Join us for departure this Friday at 6 pm.

Wednesday (1-10) at noon on Curtis Calls we'll hear Curtis students Joshua Halpern, cello & Ying Li, piano in Mendelssohn's Sonata No. 2.  Brandon Garbot, Grace Clifford, En-Chi Cheng & Timotheos Petrin play Bartók's 2nd String Quartet.  Performances from student recitals at the Curtis Institute of Music, Wednesdays at noon, repeated the folowing Monday evening at 10. 

This month on the ASCAP Deems Taylor/Virgil Thomson Award winning program Between the Keys, The Classical Network's Artist-in-Residence Jed Distler presents five programs devoted Beethoven's last five piano sonatas. Join him on Tuesday night January 9th at 10:00 as he explores Piano Sonata No. 29 in B-flat Major Op. 106, the mighty "Hammerklavier," a work that challenges performers and audiences alike. 

Distler discusses the work, followed by a recording he considers to be one of the finest versions of Op. 106 ever made, a rare 1986 release with pianist Peter Serkin.

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