Upcoming and Noteworthy

What's ahead on The Classical Network? Catch some of these great programs coming your way. Information on evening concert broadcasts of the New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony Orchestra and other nationally broadcast performances can be found on our home page.

Dances, fantasias and popular tunes for Queen Elizabeth I's Violin Band on Friday's Distant Mirror: Anonymous 16th Century music performed by the Parley of Instruments conducted by Peter Holman. Then rare  15th century English church music  featuring pieces by Walter Lamb and John Dunstable performed by the Orlando Consort from their cd The Call of the Phoenix.  Join Allan Kelly at 10pm.

With Elastigirl and family heading back to theaters next week, I thought now would be as good a time as any to get back into the “swing.”  We’ll hear selections from the sly superhero satire “The Incredibles,” for which the composer (New Jersey native Michael Giacchino) evokes the swinging espionage “sound” popularized by John Barry for the James Bond films.  Also featured will be Academy Award winning music for “Up” (also Giacchino), alongside selections from “Ice Age” (David Newman) and “The Adventures of Tintin” (John Williams).   That’s an hour of “animated” music, this Friday at 6 pm. 


The Concordia Chamber Players performs works by Aaron Jay Kernis, Ludwig van Beethoven and Richard Strauss this Friday (6/8) afternoon at 4 pm in a broadcast of its 2017 appearance at the Princeton Festival. The program includes Mozart en Route, or "A Little Traveling Music," by Kernis; Beethoven's Piano Trio in D Op. 70 No. 1, "Ghost" Trio; and Strauss' Piano Quartet in C minor Op 13.

On the concert you'll hear pianist William Wolfram, violinist Emily Daggett Smith, violist Ayane Kozasa and cellist Michelle Djokic. Glenn Smith will be your host for this afternoon broadcast.

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In an effort to expand its reach to new, particularly younger audiences, The Princeton Festival has announced a new "Young Friends of the Princeton Festival" program. This week on A Tempo (6/9 at 7 pm), host Rachel Katz will speak with CJ Ru, the Princeton Festival's director of operations, about this program, which includes discounted tickets on select performances  of the Festival's opera production of Puccini's Madama Butterfly, and a drink at intermission to those between the ages of 21 and 40.

The second opera in Richard Wagner’s “Ring Cycle,” “Die Walkure,” is this week’s Sunday Opera (6/10 3:00 p.m.) from the Lyric Opera of Chicago.  Wotan’s daughters, the Valkyries. are charged with determining who will live or die in battle, and when Wotan’s favorite, Brunnhilde, disobeys him and allows Siegmund to live, she is stripped of her powers, turned mortal, and encircled by a magic flame to remain in an enchanted sleep forever.   

Between  composing the Abduction from the Seraglio in 1782 and 1786, when he wrote The Impresario and The Marriage of Figaro, Mozart paid little attention to opera, concentrating instead on his concert career as a pianist and writing mostly instrumental music. But he did start two operas, Lo Sposo Deluso, and L'oca del Cairo. Neither was finished, and only fragments of each are left today.

The Lost Chord: June 10 - Franckly Belgian

Jun 7, 2018

As a teacher at the Paris Conservatory, Belgian born organist and composer César Franck became highly influential among a generation of French and Belgian musicians.  We’ll examine the reasons why, and hear music by Armand Marsick (his symphonic poem “La Source”) and Guillaume Lekeu (his Violin Sonata), this Sunday at 10 pm.

Sunday evening (6-10) at 11 we'll hear Images of Mogador by James Hartway,  Lee McQuillan's Concerto for Alto Sax and the Piano Quintet by Rachel Matthews.  Music from the past half-century on Half Past.

Thursday's (6-7) Noontime Concert by the Princeton Chapel Choir & Orchestra includes Ralph Vaughan Williams' Five Variants of Dives and Lazarus and Joseph Haydn's Mass for Troubled Times.  Penna Rose conducts.

This Wednesday, 6-6 at noon we'll hear Curtis students in Poulenc's Sonata for Violin & Piano, a waltz by Augustin Barrios & Davidsbundlertanze by Robert Schumann.  Performances from student recitals at the Curtis Institute, Wednesdays at noon and Monday evening at 10. 

Mily Balakirev, the founder of “The Mighty Handful” – that group of Russian nationalist composers in which he was joined by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Modest Mussorgsky, Alexander Borodin, and Cesar Cui – had very strong ideas about what Russian music should be.  He was not at all bashful about telling other composers what to do.  However, his late disciple, Sergei Lyapunov, was as much influenced by the keyboard prowess of Franz Liszt as he was the patriotic zeal of his mentor.  Develop a liking for Lyapunov, this Sunday at 10 pm. 

This is a rare chance to hear At the Boar's Head. Holst wrote several operas, but none, except Savatri, have found much of an audience. At the Boar's Head is no exception. Why is up for debate - it seems a natural pairing of a great English composer with England's great playwright. But languish it has - undeservedly. 

June may not be bustin’ out all over, but it is certainly wet, and as we enter the month of June, this week’s Dress Circle (6/3 7:00 p.m.) will take a look at some of the shows that have opened this month.  The “summer” months are notoriously lean for Broadway openings, and June is the month of the Tony Awards, so shows generally don’t open then since they would have to be remembered for an entire year before voting occurs.  In any case, we will hear songs from musicals including “Godspell,” “I’m Getting My Act Together and Taking It on the Road,” “Seventeen,” the 1993 revival of “Chicago,”

Jordi Savall and Hesperion XX I visit Distant Mirror Friday night with Elizabethan consort music from the cd "Teares of the Muses":  Pavans, galliards and almans of Anthony Holborne from his  collection of 1599, which was the first printed collection of dance music to appear in England. Join Allan Kelly at 10pm. 

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